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Maths

Maths

Working towards the expected standard

The pupil can:

• read and write numbers in numerals up to 100.

• partition a two-digit number into tens and ones to demonstrate an understanding of place value, though they may use structured resources to support them.

• add and subtract two-digit numbers and ones, and two-digit numbers and tens, where no regrouping is required, explaining their method verbally, in pictures or using apparatus (e.g. 23 + 5; 46 + 20; 16 – 5; 88 – 30).

• recall at least four of the six number bonds for 10 and reason about associated facts (e.g. 6 + 4 = 10 , therefore 4 + 6 = 10 and 10 – 6 = 4).

• count in twos, fives and tens from 0 and use this to solve problems.

• know the value of different coins.

• name some common 2-D and 3-D shapes from a group of shapes or from pictures of the shapes and describe some of their properties (e.g. triangles, rectangles, squares, circles, cuboids, cubes, pyramids and spheres).

 

Working at the expected standard

The pupil can:

• read scales in divisions of ones, twos, fives and tens.

• partition any two-digit number into different combinations of tens and ones, explaining their thinking verbally, in pictures or using apparatus.

• add and subtract any 2 two-digit numbers using an efficient strategy, explaining their method verbally, in pictures or using apparatus (e.g. 48 + 35; 72 – 17).

• recall all number bonds to and within 10 and use these to reason with and calculate bonds to and within 20, recognising other associated additive relationships (e.g. If 7 + 3 = 10, then 17 + 3 = 20; if 7 – 3 = 4, then 17 – 3 = 14; leading to if 14 + 3 = 17, then 3 + 14 = 17, 17 – 14 = 3 and 17 – 3 = 14).

• recall multiplication and division facts for 2, 5 and 10 and use them to solve simple problems, demonstrating an understanding of commutativity as necessary.

• identify 1/4, 1/3 , 1/2 , 2/4, 3/4, of a number or shape, and know that all parts must be equal parts of the whole.

• use different coins to make the same amount.

• read the time on a clock to the nearest 15 minutes.

• name and describe properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes, including number of sides, vertices, edges, faces and lines of symmetry.

 

Working at greater depth

The pupil can:

• read scales where not all numbers on the scale are given and estimate points in between.

• recall and use multiplication and division facts for 2, 5 and 10 and make deductions outside known multiplication facts.

• use reasoning about numbers and relationships to solve more complex problems and explain their thinking (e.g. 29 + 17 = 15 + 4 + ; ‘together Jack and Sam have £14. Jack has £2 more than Sam. How much money does Sam have? etc.).

• solve unfamiliar word problems that involve more than one step (e.g. ‘which has the most biscuits, 4 packets of biscuits with 5 in each packet or 3 packets of biscuits with 10 in each packet?’).

• read the time on a clock to the nearest 5 minutes.

• describe similarities and differences of 2-D and 3-D shapes, using their properties (e.g. that two different 2-D shapes both have only one line of symmetry; that a cube and a cuboid have the same number of edges, faces and vertices, but different dimensions).


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